A Simple Question

John Frame is one of the theologians who has most influenced me over the past few years. I love the way that he is able to communicate complex truths in simple ways. In one of his articles, he speaks on Christian education from Deuteronomy 6:6-9, saying:

“God-centered” is really too weak a term to describe this kind of education. “God-saturated” is more like it. Children are to grow up in an environment where they cannot avoid the Word of God; it is always there, searching them, admonishing them, instructing them in the truth. [emphasis mine]

I love this statement. Christian education should be so saturated with God, through his Word, that students cannot avoid encountering what He has to say.

So here is the simple question: Can a student in your class avoid being searched, corrected, and instructed by the Word of God?

I pray that we would all improve in this area so that our teaching is truly biblical. Let me close by quoting Frame from the same article. Note his strong case for a truly biblical form of biblical integration:

It follows that everything the child learns about the world should be related to God’s Word. And in a way Scripture speaks about everything. It doesn’t give us detailed instruction about plumbing, or British history, or auto repair, but it does teach us how to relate all these things to God, how to study them, and how to implement our studies in practical life so that God is pleased. We cannot, for example, study history while ignoring divine providence, let alone (as in many secular curricula) ignoring the substantial role of religion in forming the culture and politics of nations. We cannot teach science without emphasizing that this world is created and directed by God. It is God’s providence that makes the world an orderly place that we can understand and dominate (Gen. 1:28-30). We cannot teach modern music and film without teaching children how to evaluate these from God’s perspective.

 

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