WRONG WAYS TO THINK ABOUT BIBLICAL INTEGRATION: PART TWO

This is the second post in a short series about some of the mistakes that we can make concerning biblical integration. The goal is not to point the finger at those who struggle in these areas, but to address some real struggles so that we can serve God and our students more effectively. False dichotomies are at the root of these issues—we think that we must be this or that. However, as you will see, that is not always the case. (Note: this list starts at #3 because it is a continuation what was started in the previous post.)

Wrong Way # 3: Biblical Integration requires the teacher to be a Bible-expert.

The false choice here is between knowing something and knowing many things. A teacher does not need to be an expert in order to be an excellent teacher. Parents don’t have to be world-class cyclists to help their kids learn to ride bikes. Math teachers do not need to understand the deepest, most intense new ideas and theories in the field to help students thrive in geometry class. Likewise, you do not need to be a Bible expert in order to be effective in helping your students to know and follow God more. Conclusion: Yes, we should all keep learning, but we do not need to know everything in order to successfully teach something.

Wrong Way # 4: The point of biblical integration is Bible knowledge.

Knowledge is important in education, but it is far from the only important thing. Art and music classes are excellent examples of courses that often prioritize application and understanding over information. A student may learn a certain musical technique in ten seconds, but spend the next ten weeks perfecting it. In the same way, biblical integrators in all subjects can feel free to focus on how their material illuminates, expresses, or applies worldview issues. In your class, teach the knowledge that the students need for your subject area. This will mean that a specific set of biblical truths and ideas will be discussed. However, the scope of the biblical knowledge you teach  should not outdistance the academic content that is being integrated. Science class must remain science class, and music class must remain music class. The biblical knowledge/principles/foundations should support the class-material so that students can understand God’s world better through God’s Word. Conclusion: The point is not Bible knowledge, but biblical understanding that leads to biblical thinking and living.

Wrong Way # 5: The teacher needs to do all the integrating.

We can fall into the trap of an unnecessary dichotomy here when we think that, in integration, the instructor must always tell the students how to integrate. As you know, the point of a class is not for a teacher to teach, but for students to learn. We don’t celebrate the moments where we taught well unless we recognize that the students are learning well. Therefore, as you approach biblical integration, your goal is to help the students become integrators themselves. You won’t be there to do it for them over the long-term. They need to see how things fit together in God’s world—and you can show them that at times—but that is not the end goal. The ultimate goal is that they would learn to see and understand the world, their own lives, and everything else in light of who God is and what He has said. Therefore, it is appropriate to ask questions that make them become integrators. You can  require them to explore the Scriptures and seek truth. Conclusion You don’t need to approach biblical integration ready to teach all the good answers. Instead, you can come armed with good questions and wrestle alongside your students.  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s